Highest and Lowest Canadian Divorce Rates By Profession

Highest and Lowest Canadian Divorce Rates By Profession

The average marriage today only lasts seven years. Even more shocking, roughly half of all marriages end in divorce. That’s worth repeating: 50% of all marriages end in divorce.

Though America certainly has its problems with divorce, as the U.S. has the third highest divorce rate, Canada’s marriages are in jeopardy of ending prematurely, as well.

According to M.J. O’Nions, approximately 38% of all Canadian marriages end in divorce. While the total divorce rate has been steady since the 1980s, there has been an increase in the divorce rate for newer marriages. The average length of marriages across Canada is 14 years — with 42% of the divorces occurring for relationships lasting between 10 and 24 years.

Business Insider put together a study analyzing divorce and professions. Obviously, a job title isn’t the only determining factor when it comes to divorce, but it’s worth noting.

Here are the 10 occupations with the highest divorce rates:

  • Gaming Managers — 52.9%
  • Bartenders — 52.7%
  • Flight Attendants — 50.5%
  • Gaming Services Workers — 50.3%
  • Rolling Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders — 50.1%
  • Switchboard Operators — 49.7%
  • Drawing Machine Setters — 49.6%
  • Telemarketers — 49.2%
  • Textile Machine Operators — 48.9%
  • Compacting Machine Setters — 48.8%

Here are the 10 occupations with the lowest divorce rates:

  • Actuaries — 17%
  • Physical Scientists — 18.9%
  • Medical and Life Scientists — 19.6%
  • Clergy — 19.8%
  • Software Developers –20.3%
  • Physical Therapist — 20.7%
  • Optometrists — 20.8%
  • Chemical Engineers — 21.1%
  • Directors of Religious Activities and Education — 21.3%
  • Physicians and Surgeons — 21.8%

“If someone who is already a physician, quits and takes a job as a bartender or telemarketer, it doesn’t mean their chances of divorce changes. It probably says more about the person than anything else,” said Nathan Yau, a statistician who worked on the study published in Flowing Data.