Spiritwalkers Cross Nipigon Bridge on Day Five

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The Spiritwalkers approach the Nipigon Bridge
The Spiritwalkers approach the Nipigon Bridge
The Spiritwalkers approach the Nipigon Bridge
The Spiritwalkers approach the Nipigon Bridge

By Peter Rasevych

LAKE HELEN FN – The amazing group of unified Spiritwalkers walked 3.5 km as a powerful spiritual force, from Lake Helen First Nation, and across the Nipigon River Bridge then through the Town of Nipigon.

We then split into three groups to cover the 53 km distance all the way to the community of Pearl.

The group that I was in started at the Tim Hortons in Nipigon to Black Sturgeon River Bridge (17 km). The second group walked from there to Wolf River Bridge (16 km). The third group walked from there to the picnic stop at Pearl (20 km).

Miigwech to Jolene Cote from Lake Helen First Nation, the Nipigon townspeople who supported us, and to the Anishnawbek Police Service with the Ontario Provincial Police who are helping care for us.

It was a very hot day – with 33-celsius under blazing sun conditions on the highway.

The prayer theme for healing today was: suicides in First Nation communities.

Far too many of our people leave this life in that way. Tomorrow will be Day 6, and we will walk 45 km from the community of Pearl to the Terry Fox Memorial & Monument in Thunder Bay. The healing through prayer theme for prayer tomorrow will be “Land, Water & Air.” Miigwech to all Spiritwalkers and supporters (July 19, 2018)

Tomorrow will be Day 6, and we will walk 45 km from the community of Pearl to the Terry Fox Memorial & Monument in Thunder Bay. The healing through prayer theme for prayer tomorrow will be “Land, Water & Air.” Miigwech to all Spiritwalkers and supporters (July 19, 2018)

Miigwech to all Spiritwalkers and supporters (July 19, 2018)

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Peter Rasevych is a Ginoogaming First Nation band member who also has family roots in Long Lake #58 First Nation, as well as Fort William First Nation. He is an avid trapper, fisherman, and hunter on his family’s traditional territory near Longlac, in northwestern Ontario. He is also a fully licensed children’s hockey, soccer, and lacrosse coach. He was born in Toronto, Ontario and was raised there as well as in Montreal, Quebec. As a youth, Peter attended high school in the Town of Pickering (near Toronto) as well as at Riverdale High School (in Montreal). He graduated from John Abbott College (a CEGEP in Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec) with a DEC (Diploma D’Etudes Collegiales) in Social Sciences after studying there from 1989-91. He attained Honour Roll status for three of his four semesters there. He was then awarded with a Bachelor of Arts Degree (BA in English) from McGill University (Montreal) in 1994, after three years of study there. After travelling across Canada and living and working in the bush, he later attended Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, where he graduated with an Honours Bachelor of Arts (HBA in English) in 1998, as well as a Master’s Degree (MA in English) in 2001, where he completed a thesis which was published by the National Library of Canada. Peter’s research focus on traditional First Nations spiritual values, beliefs and culture led him to pursue a PhD in Natural Resources Management at Lakehead University from 2009-12. His research was centred on traditional Anishnawbe spiritual knowledge as it relates to the land, water, and animals. He has also worked for many years in First Nations community development, education, and human and social development at the local band office level on Ginoogaming First Nation, as well as at the tribal council level (Matawa First Nations), and also at the provincial territorial level (OSHKI, for Nishnawbe-Aski Nation). He has taught post-secondary courses for Confederation College (Negahneewin College) in Thunder Bay, in addition to instructing for courses at Lakehead University (Indigenous Learning, English, and Social Work). In addition to articles, his writing interests include research reports, essays, and creative outlets such as short stories, poetry, songs, and short novels. His interests include traditional Anishnawbe spirituality, and camping/living out in the bush as he has done with family since the age of 4.