Pow wow drums and dancers celebrate Aboriginal Culture

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For the Love of It! Family Day Pow Wow at Dennis Franklin Cromarty
For the Love of It! Family Day Pow Wow at Dennis Franklin Cromarty

For the Love of It! Family Day Pow Wow at Dennis Franklin Cromarty
For the Love of It! Family Day Pow Wow at Dennis Franklin Cromarty

THUNDER BAY – The beat of the drum filled the gym at Dennis Franklin Cromarty High School in Thunder Bay today. For the Love of It, a Family Day Pow Wow saw the gymnasium at the high school on Edward Street full of drummers, dancers, and spectators. 

Pow wow drums and dancers celebrate Aboriginal Culture

The event which started last year, was co-ordinated by Raven Linklater, and supported by many people from across the community. Everyone involved in the event volunteered their services to make the very successful Pow wow.


Family Day Pow Wow – For the love of it – Dennis Franklin Cromarty Thunder Bay by netnewsledger


Family Day Pow Wow – Dennis Frankin Cromarty School by netnewsledger

Pow Wows are a big part of Culture

The Pow Wow is an important part of Aboriginal culture. The set up of the Pow Wow will depend on what the spirits are telling the Elder. The Pow wow begins with the Grand Entry, when all dancers enter the Dance Circle for the first time. There is a Veteran’s Song to honour the veterans of battles. World War 1, World War 2, Korea, Vietnam, and Afghanistan veterans are all recognized.

The drum is the centre of the Pow Wow.

It represents the Earth or the circle of life. The drum is made of a hide membrane stretched across a circular wooden frame. The drum is usually a little less than a metre across and about two-thirds of a metre high. It is set on a blanket on the ground or on a cedar stand.

The male singers sit around the drum, beating with round-headed drumsticks. The singers are called drummers, singers, drum or drum group.