Wild Rice Bounty Shared with Thunder Bay and Northern Communities

Social Distancing observed as orders of Wild Rice are divided up
Social Distancing observed as orders of Wild Rice are divided up

THUNDER BAY – Moffat Makuto says that 52,000 pounds of wild rice arrived at the RFDA this morning. The wild rice is destined for sharing with local organizations and First Nations across the north.

The wild-rice is a donation from Kelly and Sarah Carrick to feed First Nation families facing a food crisis during the COVID-19 pandemic.  Since early April, the Carricks have also been feeding needy students involved with the Regional Multicultural Youth  Council (RMYC).  They have paid for on average 163 meals delivered to the students, their siblings and parents every Friday evening.

The shipment was timely for the Friendship Centre and Matawa who were preparing food hampers today for delivery to families tomorrow. Fort William First Nation sent a trailer and got their share of the bounty too.

Some of the wild rice was also sent to the Shelter House, Grace’s Place, and Dilico.

Moffat says, “We are working with NAN, the Northern Chiefs, Matawa to arrange shipments to their respective reserves.  I am also working with RFDA to combine the wild-rice with the food deliveries they will be making to some of the NAN communities.”

“We are negotiating with the Northern Chiefs and other interested communities to give them extra wild rice to be used as seed.  We would like the youth to learn how to grow their own food.  This could be a summer project that could enhance food security.”