January 26, 2022 – Thunder Bay District Health Unit COVID-19 Update

1153
COVID-19 Testing

302 Active Cases – 41 in Hospital – Seven in ICU

THUNDER BAY – COVID-19 Update – The Thunder Bay District Health Unit reports another person has died as a result of COVID-19. This brings the district’s death toll from the virus to 74 people.

The TBDHU says there are 302 active cases as of today. There are 40 people being treated for COVID-19 in the Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre. Ten of those patients are in the Intensive Care Unit.

Ontario is reporting 92 deaths as a result of the virus. There have been 1000 deaths since December 1st 2021 in Ontario.

Across Ontario there are 608 people in Intensive Care Units with COVID-19.

83 per cent of patients admitted to the ICU were admitted for COVID-19 and 17 per cent were admitted for other reasons but have tested positive for COVID-19. Ontario is also reporting 4,016 COVID hospitalizations.

With changes to testing, the actual number of COVID-19 cases is likely five to eight times higher.

Ontario is set to start re-opening on January 31st. The Canada Games Complex, city arenas, and other facilities will start opening.

Additionally some of the restrictions on restaurants will be eased.

Preserving your Mental Health

Things you can do to support yourself and your family:

  • Stay informed, but avoid excessive exposure to media coverage of COVID-19. Periodically check the news and recommendations from trusted sites such as Corona virus disease (COVID-19) and local health authorities. Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories. It can be upsetting to hear about the crisis in a constant stream.
  • Take care of your body. Take deep breaths, stretch or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced meals, exercise regularly, get plenty of sleep and avoid excessive alcohol and recreational drugs.
  • Accept that there may be disappointment or frustration at changing plans such as cancelled or postponed vacations, or family visits.  Acknowledge and accept strong emotions.
  • Try as much as possible to stick to a daily routine, or create new ones to get through this period. If possible, make opportunities for children to play and relax.
  • Connect with others in your social networks virtually through e-mail, phone calls or social media. Share your concerns and how you are feeling with a friend or family member. Maintain healthy relationships.
  • Draw on skills that you have used in the past during difficult times to manage your emotions during this outbreak. Relaxation techniques may work for some people, others may find engaging in enjoyable hobbies or activities is effective.
  • Maintain a sense of hope and positive thinking.
  • Focus on the positive aspects of your life and things you can control. For situations that are beyond your control, you may want to shift your emotional response by distracting yourself with another task (cooking, cleaning), going for a walk, taking a bath, talking to a friend on the phone or meditating.
  • Stay prepared and apply social distancing and preventive measures such as frequent hand washing and cough etiquette. If you are sick, stay home and reach out to medical as appropriate to your situation (e.g., military compared to civilian).

Protecting others in your home

If someone in your home has tested positive for COVID-19, you must take precaution to protect yourself and others in the home.

Do not provide care for a positive case if you are at risk of severe disease or outcomes from COVID-19.

You and the infected person should be wearing a respirator (or a medical mask if a respirator is not available) if in close contact.

Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

Disinfect high touch surfaces often. Such as Toilets, doorknobs, television remotes, phones.