People from War Zone in Ukraine Share Stories

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Damage from War
Damage from War

Ukraine People Share Stories

My name is Anna Maslovych. I have lived my whole life in a quiet neighborhood of Kyiv, but after the start of the war I had to move first to Irpin for a couple of days, and then to Germany.

“I was (and technically still am, even though I’m questioning it every day) a third-year student of international relations at National University of Kyiv Mohyla Academy.

“I used to spend most of my time reading for seminars, learning foreign languages and working a part-time job.

“Now I don’t really know what the future will bring, but I’m trying to focus on helping my country by participating in the information and media campaigns, with my university peers and personally on social media.

“I feel angry and heartbroken for the home I left behind, I am scared for my friends and relatives who are still in Ukraine, and I feel anxiety about the hazy future.

“However, I also feel unity with all Ukrainians, defiance and power to stop the invasion no matter what. I think the most important help other countries can provide is humanitarian help for people stuck in hot zones, volunteering and accommodation for refugees, and pushing for NATO to close the sky and impose more sanctions on Russia.

“The more the Ukrainian sky stays open, the more civilians, including children, are going to die, the more infrastructure and historic monuments will be destroyed. As much as Western leaders are relying on diplomacy, I really don’t think it’s helpful in our case. We need to close the sky and be more forceful – and I think it would be completely justified.”

My name is Oleksii Mutskyi. “I am a law student at the National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy.

“Now I am in Chernihiv, in my hometown. Explosions are heard everywhere every day and my family has to sleep in the basement of our apartment building. Even though we still have food, the city appears to be on lockdown, as it is a strategically important point for Russia.

“We feel inspired, although these days are very difficult for everyone here. We believe in the Ukrainian army and in our victory.

“For us, the most important things are the support from the European Union and the sanctions against Russia. Another important point is to protect the skies over Ukraine in order to save the lives of Ukrainian citizens.”

My name is Daria Sholomitska, or simply Dasha.

Up until the Russian attack on Ukraine I’ve been living in Kyiv. After hearing the first explosions on February 24th at 5 a.m. my parents desperately wanted me and my brother to be in a place where we would feel safer. So for now, we are temporarily in the Vinnytsia region.

Before the full-scale war, I was studying at the National of Kyiv Mohyla Academy. I am still a third-year student of International Relations (which often seems ironic to me, given the circumstances), although studying is hardly the first thing on my mind now. For the last two weeks, I’ve been trying to do what I can on the informational front. In our team of Uni-mates, we’re creating materials for the foreign media to tell more people what really is going on here.

The main thing for me now is that I am safe, I have a warm bed to sleep in, food to eat and a place to do at least something that might help. For this, I am very grateful. I am of course frustrated and angered by all of the deaths, ruins and tragedies caused by the Russians in my country. Like all of those who left their home, I really miss my city. I am strong-minded in my plans not to leave Ukraine.

It is essential for everyone to understand that this war is caused only for the reason that one country does not want the other one to be as free and as democratic as they want. My message is simple: support Ukraine. Help us as much as you can. Because this war is not only about us. It is about the value of human lives and basic human values, a safe Europe and a safe world.


Article is provided by representatives of Kyiv-Mohyla University who have made their services available to provide accurate, timely, on-the-ground reporting about the war in Ukraine, including nuanced localized ongoing updates on what is happening across the country, as well as commentary and analysis.