The Bombay Times and Journal of Commerce Celebrates Anniversary

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The Times of India started printing in 1838 as the Bombay Times and Journal of Commerce
The Times of India started printing in 1838 as the Bombay Times and Journal of Commerce

The Times of India started printing in 1838 as the Bombay Times and  Journal of Commerce
The Times of India started printing in 1838 as the Bombay Times and Journal of Commerce
THUNDER BAY – On the subcontinent of India, on this day, in 1838 what has evolved into the world’s most widely read English newspaper began publishing its first hand printed, folded copies in the historic harbour city of then Bombay.

It was known as the Bombay Times and Journal of Commerce. The paper did not become a daily until 1850. The international harbour at Bombay was originally named by Portuguese explorers as Bom Bahai. Though it’s notation as Bombay came from English sailors who spoke it that way, logged it as such on early maps.

The Times’ 19th Century tabloid attempted to cover all things ‘newsy’ in the Victorian Era as historical events emerged.

Kipling also wrote for the paper.
Kipling also wrote for the paper.
Its time zine in history would have been a source for columns by upcoming writers and journalists like Rudyard Kipling. Though Kipling originally began writing with The Gazette in Lahore.

Still being sold at a few rupees, these days, the Times is ‘so kindly affordable’ to the teeming massive populations throughout India who may never be able to afford radio or satellite TV.

These days, it is estimated the English Edition of the Times of India reaches the mind boggling mathematics of 7.6 million readers every day.

Yet, in its own efforts, at standards in the media, the Times still attempts to print with its original publishers the line of: all the news…that’s fit for ink today.

Ronn Hartviksen