Superior North EMS Warns About Dangers of Bumper Surfing

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Superior EMSTHUNDER BAY – Superior North EMS paramedics are warning the public of a dangerous activity that is occurring in the Longlac #58 First Nation.

On this First Nation, “bumper surfing” (an activity when someone, usually a youngster, hangs onto or sits on the bumper of a moving vehicle) is becoming ever more common. This is occurring now when an ambulance is moving through the First Nation, often with paramedics unaware. Youths are either sitting on the rear bumper, or hanging on and “skiing” on snow covered roads. Both occur when the vehicle is moving.

“We have had instances when paramedics are unaware of an individual or group of people hanging onto and/or sitting on our ambulances while travelling through the Longlac #58 First Nation.” said EMS Superintendent Stephane Leblanc. “In some cases our paramedics have travelled out and onto the highway unknowingly with someone hiding on their bumper.”

Superior North EMS officials are working with First Nations officials in trying to deal with the problem. Strategies are being developed. Superior North EMS are requesting assistance from the public in addressing “bumper surfing” activity by relaying its dangers to youngsters.

Editors Note: Growing up in Winnipeg it is called “bumper shining” or “bumpering”. I was smart enough to never do it, especially after watching a kid end up on concrete and his running shoes started smoking. He literally burnt the soles off his shoes. That convinced me, in Grade Seven to never bother trying this. I simply thought how one’s face would look after being slid along the roadway.