Riverfest Connects Fort William with History

Music was aboard the Nina, a small motor cruiser owned by Paul Morralee a Kam River Park enthusiast
Music was aboard the Nina, a small motor cruiser owned by Paul Morralee a Kam River Park enthusiast

Canadian Coast Guard was onsite at Riverfest
Canadian Coast Guard Cape Chaillon was onsite at Riverfest

Fort William Was Industrial and Water Connected

THUNDER BAY – Riverfest on Saturday was a sharing of the history along the Kaministiquia River and the south of Thunder Bay

The history of the former City of Fort William was tied to both rail and to the water. The grain elevators across the south of modern day Thunder Bay were a direct connection for the city to the world.

The RCMP were on hand at Riverfest making friends with the children and adults alike
The RCMP were on hand at Riverfest making friends with the children and adults alike

The Industrial Kam

The Fort William Waterfront was connecting industry and the river to the Great Lakes
The Fort William Waterfront was connecting industry and the river to the Great Lakes

The first grain elevators in the area were along the Kam River. It was the efforts of Port Arthur business owners and C.D. Howe who put in place what today are the strings of elevators along the Thunder Bay North shoreline.

The entire area is continuing to change. Today, Fort William is more of the hub of civic government, and government services. The new court house on Brodie Street is shifting the downtown. The renovations at City Hall have made a huge change in how people connect with each other. This summer’s City Hall Sounds brought the plaza alive.

Volunteer Thunder Bay ran a very popular booth at Riverfest.
Volunteer Thunder Bay ran a very popular booth at Riverfest.

Downtown gaining a more solid connection to the waterfront and our past should be a task that the city and businesses look at.

At Riverfest, there are more people down at the Kam River Park than at any other time of the year.

The James Whalen was not open to the public at Riverfest
The James Whalen was not open to the public at Riverfest

This year, there was activity. That activity reduced some of the less desired activities that citizens have raised concerns about with city officials. Many have expressed concern over the level of police patrols in the area. Those concerns were made evident on Saturday when the James Whalen was unavailable for tours. Reportedly the volunteers found that people had broken into the tugboat and were living in the ship.

VIA Rail train at Kam River Park near the downtown South Core CBD
VIA Rail train at Kam River Park near the downtown South Core CBD

The Via Rail Train was also closed at Riverfest. 

The music and fun of Riverfest offered a very welcome respite for Kam River Park. 

Music was aboard the Nina, a small motor cruiser  owned by Paul Morralee a Kam River Park enthusiast
Music was aboard the Nina, a small motor cruiser owned by Paul Morralee a Kam River Park enthusiast

A line of gulls were enjoying the quiet of Kam River Park on Sunday morning.
A line of gulls were enjoying the quiet of Kam River Park on Sunday morning.

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