$1.5 million Google contribution to Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business

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    CANADIAN MONEY

    In tech and business news, the latest word on the Canadian business street is that recently, Google Canada announced a $1.5 million commitment towards the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business (CCAB). This commitment has been made in honour of supporting indigenous Canadian businesses and entrepreneurs. Where as reported one million of the funds will be used towards cash grants and memberships, the Aboriginal Business (TFAB) platform is set to benefit greatly and serve the community in turn.

    Moreover, reportedly, Google will provide an additional $500,000 to reach a broader audience, promote their programs and share all the latest research with the public. What exactly has led to this whopping contribution and what does it further entail for the Aboriginal business community of Canada? This article investigates the news in more detail.

    Why the contribution?

    With a reported 60,000 First Nations, Métis, and Inuit owned businesses in Canada, together, the indigenous business community contributes over $30 billion annually to Canada’s GDP. By 2025, the contribution is expected to be even more. However, Indigenous businesses have been adversely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, and thus, are in need of any and all financial assistance from power-companies and tech giants such as Google.  As a matter of fact, According to CCAB research, over half of Indigenous businesses reported heavily declined revenues during the pandemic, with many even closing down and/or laying off valued staff members.

    Committed to the full participation and promotion of Indigenous peoples in Canada’s economy, the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business’s mission is to promote, strengthen and enhance a most bustling and healthy indigenous economy. Fostering this mission through business relationships, opportunities, and awareness, CCAB offers a wealth pond of knowledge, resources, and programs to its members. Their efforts are undoubtedly unmissable, as it cultivates economic opportunities for indigenous peoples and businesses across Canada. Indigenous themes are also prominently used in the Canadian e-Sporting sector such as the highest payout online casino in Canada – as well as other arenas that integrate Canadian culture with business.

    Given the importance and presence of the Aboriginal community of Canada for the country as a whole, Google identified a need for these aspiring people to contribute their worth to Canadian society and the business sector in particular. With Aboriginal culture forming such an intricate part of Canadian culture itself, the worth of the contribution made by Google cannot – and must not be understated.

    How will it benefit the Aboriginal Business Community?

    According to CCAB President and CEO, Tabatha Bull, working with Google Canada means helping to close the digital divide, which means more opportunities for Indigenous businesses and communities. In commandment of Google’s commitment of cash grants and support for the redevelopment of their TFAB platform, it increases participation for Indigenous businesses and entrepreneurs within the digital skills-based economy and beyond.

    The $1.5 million grant will not only establish new programs that directly address the needs of Indigenous businesses, but through the receival of cash grants and CCAB memberships will grant the opportunity to investing and re-build the Tools and Financing for the Aboriginal Business (TFAB) platform. This will entail the provision of new training and resources to Indigenous entrepreneurs over the span of the next two years.

    In addition, Google will also offer several CCAB donated ads to properly promote programs and the new TFAB platform through Google Search advertising. It has also been confirmed that indigenous-owned marketing agency, Jelly Marketing, will help support this particular digital marketing campaign.

    What are the biggest challenges faced?

    As the Indigenous economy attempts to recover itself from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, report point to financial assistance, business digitization, and developing eCommerce skills and digital marketing as key areas of need. Over the past 8 months, Google has worked with CCAB to understand the growth obstacles Indigenous-owned businesses face and discuss how they could partner up to grow the Indigenous digital economy.

    According to Sabrina Geremia, VP & Country Manager of Google Canada, they are guided by CCAB’s research, and the research support will be used by CCAB to address some of the most pressing needs of Indigenous businesses in Canada. All of this will be executed with the goal of building a more inclusive and more thriving economy.

    In Conclusion

    Where the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business shares a common goal with Google, which is to solidify their partnership with the intent of growing the economy and foster new opportunities – this contribution comes as a great blessing to both organizations. With Google being in a position to support the hidden and perhaps underutilized talents of aboriginal and/or indigenous Canadians, the effects of this collaboration are expected to serve Canada’s business society well into the future.