5 Ways to Get Employees On Board With Using New HR Systems

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Man at Desk Writing

Introducing a new piece of software to your company isn’t easy, especially in times of economic turmoil. Your employees may feel that they’re being replaced or that the software they’ll use is too complicated to learn. But If you get everyone on board, the transition should be effortless.

How to Get the Business On Board With New HR Technology

Some employers may see the transition from manual procedures to semi-automatic software as pointless, but if you want to keep morale high, you’ll need to implement the following steps.

1. Explain Why the Technology is Needed

We tend to think that convincing stakeholders is the biggest barrier to implementing new tech, but your staff can be just as stubborn. It’s easy to show why health-based technology serves to benefit non-health industry employees because there’s little to no risk of widespread job loss.

Once technology starts replacing people, employees become nervous. Be sure to explain that new HR systems are here to eliminate human errors and compliance issues by giving your team access to their payroll and HR information. State that it makes their job easier and less stressful.

2. Create Video Tutorials for Common Tasks

Everyone has their own preferred method for giving and taking instruction, but video tutorials are successful with almost everyone. Since they can teach common and complicated tasks without managerial help, they’re ideal for remote/hybrid workplaces or virtual onboarding.

If you’re going to use this medium, show every single step, even if you feel it’s unimportant. It’ll limit the need for your team to ask questions or become confused during the training process.

For example, if you wanted to teach your employees how to retrieve pay stubs in the system, you could record a video of you using a paycheck stub creator. Use voice-over and images to help get employees up to speed so they aren’t intimidated by your software of choice.

3. Choose Influencers or Charismatic Teachers

While social media has made influencer marketing more common, the idea of selling products using celebrities or well-known presenters is nothing new. By the end of 2022, the influencer marketing industry will reach $16.4 billion due to how successful this tactic can often be.

If you have the capital to ask influencers for a recorded video, do so. If you don’t, start looking inside your organization for talent. Don’t choose people who are interested in the subject for this activity. Instead, find a person who’s charismatic and who can make dull topics interesting.

4. Value Routine Feedback and Adaptability 

Your company culture can impact employee readiness, adaptability, and feedback. For example, an employer who routinely offers constructive criticism/feedback and doesn’t punish failure will create a workplace full of trusted employees who aren’t afraid to make mistakes or ask for help.

It’s really common for employees to resist new tech because they require your team to make mistakes. Some team members learn slower than others, and you need to show that’s okay.

We all value stability because change often comes with many negatives, especially at work. If employers start adopting new technology consistently, employees will feel confident that change is a positive move. They’ll start valuing innovation and all the great things that come with it.

5. Consider Penalties as a Last Resort

As stated, you shouldn’t punish mistakes because they’re a natural part of learning. However, complete resistance is a problem that will affect your bottom line. If you’re seeing employees going out of their way to avoid the new HR system, speak with them privately and ask why.

You may be able to come up with a compromise that suits everyone, but if that doesn’t happen, start issuing penalties. For example, you should say that the data entered into this new system is what counts. Only use penalties as a last resort, as it could reinforce their dislike for tech.