Nipigon OPP Charge Samuel John Esquaga with Drug Trafficking

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NIPIGON – NEWS – During the month of May 2022, officers from the Nipigon Detachment of the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) conducted an investigation into complaints of drug trafficking in the town of Nipigon.

As a result of this investigation, Samuel John Esquega, 56 years old, of Nipigon, was arrested and charged with 2 counts of:

  • Trafficking in Schedule 1 Substance – Cocaine, contrary to Section 5(1) of the Controlled Drug and Substances Act.

The OPP would like to remind the public that if you observe suspicious activity you can report that activity to the Ontario Provincial Police by calling 1-888-310-1122.

Signs of illegal activity

If a property is being used for an illegal activity there are often some common signs.

Seeing one of these signs doesn’t always mean illegal activity is going on, but if they happen often or together, a problem may exist.

Some common signs of illegal activity include:

  • frequent visitors at all times of the day and night
  • frequent late night activity
  • extensive home security
  • residents that are rarely seen, distant or secretive
  • windows blackened or curtains always drawn
  • neglected property and yard
  • people repeatedly visiting the property who only go to the door for a short time
  • residents who regularly meet vehicles near the property for a short time
  • strange odours coming from the house or garbage
  • garbage that contains numerous bottles and containers, particularly chemical containers
  • putting garbage in a neighbour’s collection area

Should you wish to remain anonymous you may call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS). If you submit a tip through Crime Stoppers you may be eligible to receive a cash reward of up to $2,000.

Visit www.ontariocrimestoppers.ca if you would like more information in how to send online anonymous tips. When you submit online tips you can also send pictures, videos, audio recordings and documents.

All accused are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.