100 Years of Loss – The Residential School System in Canada

392
This week at Lakehead University is the display in the Agora of 100 Years of Loss - Canada's Residential Schools
This week at Lakehead University is the display in the Agora of 100 Years of Loss - Canada's Residential Schools

This week at Lakehead University is the display in the Agora of 100 Years of Loss - Canada's Residential Schools
This week at Lakehead University is the display in the Agora of 100 Years of Loss – Canada’s Residential Schools

THUNDER BAY – The Office of Aboriginal Initiatives and Conseil scolaire de district catholique des Aurores boréales are pleased to be hosting the 100 Years of Loss The Residential School System in Canada Mobile Exhibition at Lakehead University in the Agora from April 10-12, 2018. We would like to extend an invitation to join us at the Opening Ceremony on Tuesday, April 10, 2018, at 12:00 p.m. in the Agora. We have attached a poster with details of all events for April 10-12, 2018.

Tuesday, April 10th

Public Viewing, 1:00pm – 5:00pm, Agora

Student Panel – Learning from the Experiences of Indigenous Students, 1:00 – 2:00 pm, UC 1017

Special Invite Exhibit, Keynote Speaker – Bob Baxter, Marten Falls First Nation, 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm, Agora

Wednesday, April 11th

Public Viewing, 9:00 am – 9:00 pm, Agora

Ojibwe 101 Joanne Mendowegan, 2:30 – 3:30 pm, UC 0050 – Open to the Public

Cree 101 Susan Sandau, 5:30 – 6:30 pm, UC 0050 – Open to the Public

Thursday, April 12th

Public Viewing, 9:00 am – 3:30 pm, Agora

Closing Ceremony, 3:30 – 4:30 pm, Agora


The 100 Years of Loss mobile exhibition explores the history of the Residential School System and traces its legacy to the present. 100 Years of Loss uses archival and contemporary photographs, works of art, primary documents, and recent research to reveal the histories of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis children who were forcibly removed from their families and institutionalized in residential schools. The distinct features of 100 Years of Loss are the depth of the historical perspective and the breadth of the information presented. The story begins in the early days of European expansion into North America and continues up to and including the decades of advocacy and healing efforts by Aboriginal peoples, the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, the 2008 federal apology to Survivors and their families, and the establishment of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in 2009. One of the greatest strengths of this exhibition is its focus on the legacy of the IRS System, and in particular, its enduring impacts on Survivors and their descendants, on communities, and on Canada as a nation. The exhibition clearly shows the direct links between the Residential School System and the contemporary social crises afflicting Aboriginal communities across the country.