Defibrillator Saves Life at Canada Games Complex

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THUNDER BAY – HEALTH – A little after 9 am Tuesday morning, a call to 911 was placed by staff at the Canada Games Complex for a 64 year old male that had collapsed while playing squash. A supervisor and two life guards responded to find the male not breathing and without a pulse. CPR was initiated and the Public Access Defibrillator (PAD) was applied.

When paramedics arrived, they found the male patient had regained a pulse. Paramedics continued to provide advance life support care and transported the patient to Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Center where he is currently receiving further medical treatment. Due to the quick actions of the Canada Games Complex staff this person’s life was saved

“It took less than three minutes from the time the 911 call was placed and Games Complex staff members were notified, to the time CPR was started and a shock was delivered to this person” say Deputy Chief Andrew Dillon”. This shows why it is so important to learn the skill of CPR and for public facilities and building to have a PAD’s available”. According to the Heart and Stroke association, immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and early defibrillation can more than double a victim’s chance of survival.

This incident reminds us of the importance of learning CPR, especially for the general public, and how, when combined with early defibrillation, the difference it can make in someone’s life.

“The next time you enter a public facility in the District of Thunder Bay, I encourage you to find the location of the Public Access Defibrillator (PAD), and if you have not done so yet, take a CPR course” says Dillon.  It’s a skill I hope you will never have to use, but if needed, you can save a life.”