Chiefs and Mayors Gathering makes Good Sense

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CEDI Meeting
CEDI Meeting

CEDI Meeting
CEDI Meeting

Lac Seul First Nation – Today at a meeting in a progressive region of Ontario known as Lac Seul First Nation, they were talking about food security and working together.

Isadore Day, a candidate for the Ontario Regional Chief is in this Northern First Nation to bring discussions forward on a capital investment strategy where there is a need to provide reliable food distribution to thousands of First Nation people in remote communities.

Chief Isadore Day
Chief Isadore Day

Chief Day is also meeting with Chiefs about the upcoming June election.

Chiefs from remote communities have decided to take bold steps to making sure that their people have good and affordable sources of nutrition. A small group that formed the Community Economic Development Initiative (CEDI) are working together to address common economic challenges with solutions that will have sustained benefits for the north. One such proposal is the Regional Distribution Center study that has a long list of solutions including sustainable employment, lower food costs, healthy food choices, to name a few.

Chief Isadore Day stated, “This project is not only exciting, it’s encouraging because the issue of Food Security is a human right in the north that needs solutions – this is a demonstration of strong leadership. The Regional Distribution Center that is being designed is a vital development that is about leaders working together. We commend the work of Chief Donnie Morris, (Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug, KI), Chief Clifford Bull (Lac Seul First Nation) and Mayor Doug Lawrence, (Sioux Lookout), for taking this critical issue and proposing a bold solution.”

The two-day meeting is an example of intersecting partnerships between First Nations, municipalities, the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, and the Council for the Advancement of Native Development Officers, – the theme; “We are All Treaty People.”

“The reality of where we are at in the Ontario region is that treaty relationships need attention. Finding solutions to complex and pressing issues like food security can only be built from a strong foundation. If we go back and build from the ‘Spirit and Intent’ of treaties that were made to ensure sharing between the settlers and First Nations, we can’t go wrong – everyone benefits. This gathering makes good sense,” said Day.

The project is expected to service a population of 30,000 Northerners, and growing. For the north this is about business, food security and a human right to food.