Retired Doctor Makes Family CARE Grant for Cardiovascular Unit

1716
Lynda Piche and Wayne Taylor show the otoscope donated by retired Dr. Morris Mymko, who now sits on the Health Sciences Foundation board and reviews Family CARE Grants. Dr. Mymko was “glad to put the otoscope back to work” in the Cardiovascular Unit.
Lynda Piche and Wayne Taylor show the otoscope donated by retired Dr. Morris Mymko, who now sits on the Health Sciences Foundation board and reviews Family CARE Grants. Dr. Mymko was “glad to put the otoscope back to work” in the Cardiovascular Unit.
Lynda Piche and Wayne Taylor show the otoscope donated by retired Dr. Morris Mymko, who now sits on the Health Sciences Foundation board and reviews Family CARE Grants. Dr. Mymko was “glad to put the otoscope back to work” in the Cardiovascular Unit.
Lynda Piche and Wayne Taylor show the otoscope donated by retired Dr. Morris Mymko, who now sits on the Health Sciences Foundation board and reviews Family CARE Grants. Dr. Mymko was “glad to put the otoscope back to work” in the Cardiovascular Unit.

Healthcare in Thunder Bay Benefits from Donations

THUNDER BAY – Health – When the 2C Cardiovascular Unit applied for a Family CARE Grant to purchase an otoscope for patient examinations, help came from a very special source.

As you might imagine, the 2C unit is busy with patients being admitted and discharged every day. Every time a patient is admitted to the unit, he or she gets a physical exam.

“Two-thirds of our patients are cardiac diagnoses, and often have multiple health conditions,” said Wayne Taylor, Manager of the 2C Cardiovascular Unit. “A full head-to-toe assessment is required for all patients so we can monitor their health closely.”

Previously, the nurse practitioner or physicians on the 2C unit would use a pen light or flashlight to examine areas like ears, eyes, and throat. But in some cases, a closer examination is required, which prompted the unit to apply for the Family CARE Grant for the otoscope.

An otoscope/opthalmoscope is a multipurpose tool that provides light and also acts as a magnifying glass for a closer look. (You’ve likely seen it before, that hand-held unit with a bright light that your doctor peers into to look at your ears, eyes, and throat.)

“It’s another tool in our kit to help us better assess our patients,” Taylor said.

Usually, Family CARE Grants are awarded to cover the costs of a new piece of equipment. But in this case, the otoscope came from a retired family physician, Dr. Morris Mymko. Dr. Mymko is now on the Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Foundation board and helps review Family CARE Grants.

“When I saw this request from 2C, I remembered that I had this piece of equipment. Since I’m retired, I had no more use for it,” Dr. Mymko said. He offered to donate his personal otoscope to fulfill the grant request. “I was glad to put the otoscope back to work.”

Unlike most pieces of technology, older does mean better in this case. It is a sturdy unit with a rechargeable battery – the whole unit plugs directly into the wall. And although the history behind the otoscope doesn’t have a direct impact on patient care, there is certainly a sentimentality behind the gift.

“It was a very kind donation on Dr. Mymko’s part,” Taylor said.

Previous articleMinister Greg Rickford Celebrates Innovation
Next articleLakehead University Thunderwolves Basketball Starts 2014
Graham Strong has worked with clients in a number of different industries including healthcare, legal, PR, retail, software, IT, B2B companies, education, direct mail, and others.