RBC Steps Up to support Shkoday Abinojiiwak Obimiwedoon

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RBC

RBC THUNDER BAY – The RBC has stepped up to support Shkoday Abinojiiwak Obimiwedoon. The RBC will fund a range of programming for urban Aboriginal youth in Thunder Bay, giving them an opportunity to improve their cultural, mental, physical and emotional well-being. The funding is for $40,000.

It is the first time that RBC has funded the Thunder Bay program. The RBC After School Grants Project announced donations totaling $2.7 million to help 105 community-based organizations across Canada deliver after school programs for the 2012-2013 school year. These organizations offer a diverse range of programs, including those for inner-city children and Aboriginal youth, with activities such as computer instruction, sports, literacy tutoring, music and art lessons, nutrition guidance, and homework help.

RBC After School Grants, ranging from $25,000 to $40,000, are considered a seal of approval for program providers, not only helping them launch or amplify programming, but also enabling them to attract funding from other sources.

To qualify for an RBC grant, after school programs must offer structured and supervised activities for children between the ages of six and 17. The programs must focus on what RBC calls the “three Ss” — safety, social skills and self-esteem.

Since 1999, RBC has provided more than $27 million in grants to 248 community-based, after school programs in Canada, helping almost 29,000 children. Grant recipients are selected with the help of local advisory panels.

“In the thirteen years we’ve been funding after school programs, we’ve seen first-hand how kids enrolled in these programs are more confident and motivated to stay in school,” says Shari Austin, vice-president, corporate citizenship at RBC. “We’re confident that all our new and returning grant recipients will have a tremendous impact in helping kids realize their potential.”