CBSA officers at the Fort Frances port of entry processed 108,298 travelers in 50,272 vehicles

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Canada_Border_Services_AgencyFORT FRANCES – In June 2012, CBSA officers at the Fort Frances port of entry (POE) processed 108,298 travelers in 50,272 vehicles, which represents a 4.3 percent increase in travelers and a 4.8 percent increase in vehicles compared to June 2011. Eighty-six charter buses carrying 782 passengers, 564 commercial trucks, and 1,834 pedestrians were processed during the month.

Here are the details on some of the incidents that happened at the Fort Frances port of entry:

IMMIGRATION: CBSA officers at the Fort Frances POE conducted more than 3,000 immigration interviews resulting in the issuance of 53 work permits, seven visitor records and 523 Remote Area Border Crossing permits. A total of 135 people were found to have various admissibility issues; 65 of these people were given the option of voluntarily withdrawing their application to enter Canada and were allowed to leave. The other 70 were allowed entry on a temporary visitor permit. 

On June 1, a U.S. resident was referred to Immigration to determine his admissibility to Canada. Database queries showed that he had a lengthy criminal history in the United States including three convictions for operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated, four convictions for driving with a suspended license, possession of a controlled substance, possession of an illegally obtained prescription, disorderly conduct, and one probation violation. He was allowed to withdraw his application to enter Canada and he returned to the United States. 

The following day, another U.S. resident with a lengthy criminal record was seeking entry to Canada. A background check revealed that he had previous convictions for burglary, theft, possession of a controlled substance, manufacturing or delivering narcotics, and operating a firearm while intoxicated. The individual was allowed to withdraw his application to enter Canada and he returned to the United States.  

On June 8, a U.S. resident travelling to Vermillion Bay, Ontario, was allowed to withdraw his application to enter Canada after it was discovered that he was a member of a criminal organization in the United States. CBSA officers reported him as being inadmissible for being a member of an organized crime group and he returned to the United States.  

On June 19, a U.S. resident arrived at the Fort Frances POE seeking entry under the Tourism Facilitation Action Plan. However, he was not eligible for a Temporary Resident Permit because he had been convicted of an alcohol-related vehicular homicide. He was allowed to withdraw his application to enter Canada and he returned to the United States. 

On June 27, a U.S. resident was referred to Immigration for a more in-depth examination. Background checks revealed that he had a criminal conviction in the United States. He was allowed to withdraw his application to enter Canada due to his serious criminality and he returned to the United States. The individual returned to the Fort Frances POE later in the day and demanded to be granted entry by posting a bond. He was again given the option of voluntarily withdrawing his application to enter Canada and he returned to the United States. 

CUSTOMS: During the month of June, CBSA officers conducted over 1,600 secondary examinations for customs purposes, initiated 15 seizure actions and issued an additional 32 written warnings for non-declared or undervalued goods.  

On June 10, a U.S. resident was referred for a secondary examination which resulted in the seizure of four non-restricted long guns and 2.23kg of tobacco. When asked why he did not declare the firearms, the traveller stated that he did not think he had to as the long gun registry is no longer in effect in Canada. The firearms were returned to him upon payment of a penalty in the amount of $1,110.68. The tobacco was seized with no terms of release. The individual was allowed to enter Canada. 

On June 30, a returning Canadian resident imported a 1998 watercraft with a declared value of US$2,000. Upon further examination, it was discovered that the watercraft had actually been purchased for US$3,000. The watercraft was seized for undervaluation and returned to the individual upon payment of a $504.45 penalty. Had the full value of the watercraft been properly declared, it would have cost just $130 in additional HST.  

OFFICER POWERS: On June 9, CBSA officers arrested a U.S. resident after he failed a roadside breathalyzer test. At the primary inspection line, this individual stated that he and his passenger had entered Canada earlier in the evening and then returned to the United States to purchase alcohol. The examining officer noticed that the driver was slurring his words and smelled of alcohol. He was arrested for operating a motor vehicle with a blood-alcohol content of .16, twice the legal limit, and subsequently turned over to the Ontario Provincial Police for further investigation. On the morning of June 10, the individual was returned to the Fort Frances POE and was allowed to return to the United States.  

On June 29, a returning Canadian resident was referred for a secondary examination. A criminal record query was conducted and showed that the individual was a prohibited driver. He was arrested for driving while prohibited and turned over to the Ontario Provincial Police for further investigation.  

TRAVEL TIPS: After an absence of 24 hours, you may bring back $200 worth of goods duty- and tax-free; after 48 hours, your personal exemption will be $800. There are no exemptions for same-day travel. Alcohol and tobacco can be imported free of duty and taxes only if you have been away at least 48 hours. For amounts allowed and additional information, check http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/travel-voyage/menu-eng.html.

The CBSA reminds travellers to truthfully declare all purchases and goods received outside of Canada upon their return. Smuggling, undervaluation and other Customs Act offences may lead to seizure and/or prosecution in a court of law. The CBSA keeps a record of infractions in its computer system. If you have an infraction record, you may have to undergo a more detailed examination on future trips.

All firearms and weapons must be declared to a border services officer when you enter Canada. Failure to do so could result in them being seized, and you may face criminal charges. For more information, visit http://cbsa.gc.ca/media/facts-faits/107-eng.html.

In addition, new regulations are now in place to facilitate the entry of certain foreign nationals who do not meet the requirements to overcome their criminal inadmissibility to be allowed to enter Canada with a one-time only fee-exempt temporary resident permit. For more information, please visit the Citizenship and Immigration Canada Web site at: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/manuals/bulletins/2012/ob389.asp.

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) facilitates the entry of legitimate travellers and goods, while protecting the safety and security of Canadians and ensuring that Canada’s border is not used for illegal activity. This work is carried out by CBSA border services officers (BSOs) who ensure that the people, goods and conveyances entering Canada meet all requirements and are compliant with Canadian law.

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