Soon Halloween ghosts, goblins and witches will be knocking on your door

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THUNDER BAY – There are many in our region who are suffering from diabetes, or are in danger of getting the disease. As Halloween draws near, The Canadian Diabetes Association shares that it is relatively easy to make for a Halloween that all young trick or treaters can enjoy.

Soon the young ghosts, goblins and witches will be knocking on your door chanting “Trick or Treat.” Most often they are looking for a sweet treat and skipping over the trick. As a parent with a child who has diabetes, Halloween can still be fun and enjoyed by all.

Some ideas to allow your kids with diabetes to take part in Halloween include:

• Emphasize the non-food-related aspects of Halloween, such as costume preparation and decoration.
• Consider giving out school supplies with Halloween-related themes as candy does not have to be the only option for treats – for example: pencils. This option actually lasts longer than a piece of candy, chocolate bar or bag of chips.
• After trick-or treating, sort through your child’s sack of loot, allowing them to set aside the candies they love best. Ration these out to ensure they enjoy them at the right times – after supper for dessert, for instance, or after his/her lunch at school
• Remember that there aren’t good or bad choices when it comes to candy. A gram of carbohydrate, whether it comes from a chocolate bar or a lollipop, affects blood glucose levels in the same way. However, a Halloween-size candy, which contains between eight to 15 grams of carbohydrates, is a better choice than a big bag of chips, which is chock full of fat and calories.
• Leftover treats can be traded with siblings or ‘sold’ to parents in exchange for non-food related treats, such as a new toy.
• Consider tucking one or two of your child’s least-favourite candies in his/her schoolbag to treat hypoglycemia (low blood glucose levels). Don’t give a child a candy he/she really likes for this, since he/she may find it hard to resist and won’t save it for a low.

Whatever the occasion, kids with diabetes can be involved. By determining the details in advance, you and your child will be prepared to participate and have fun!

The Canadian Diabetes Association works in communities across the country to promote the health of Canadians and eliminate diabetes through our strong nationwide network of volunteers, employees, healthcare professionals, researchers, partners and supporters. In the struggle against this global epidemic, our expertise is recognized around the world. The Canadian Diabetes Association: setting the world standard. To learn more, visit diabetes.ca or call 1-800-BANTING (226-8464).