Flamme Olympique Hockey AAA and APBM U18 and U20 Team Canada International

Flamme Olympique Hockey AAA and APBM U18 and U20 Team Canada International

Flamme Olympique AAA U11-U13-U15-U18-U20

By Peter Rasevych

On the road (and plane) with Donald Lucas and Canadian youths to southern Ontario and Europe

Donald Lucas, President of Flamme Olympique AAA Hockey (based in Gatineau, Quebec) is a man on a mission. He has spent the majority of his time over the past seven years dedicated to hockey players aged Novice to Junior levels (aged 7 to 21), in furthering their young hockey careers and aspirations.

I had the opportunity to sit down with Donald recently, to conduct an interview with him, in the hopes of illuminating his vision and goals for the hockey operation that he has been involved in since 2013 with his wife, Joanne Villeneuve. Both Donald and Joanne pour their hearts endlessly, into creating opportunities for AA and AAA level hockey players. They are both very kind, approachable people who are very astute and knowledgeable with respect to children, adolescents, and young adults who play the sport of hockey.

EARLY YEARS OF FLAMME OLYMPIQUE AAA HOCKEY

Why did Donald start doing this in 2013? What was his motivation?

Flamme Olympique Hockey AAA and APBM U18 and U20 Team Canada International“I have a younger brother who ran a hockey school for five years, starting back in 2007,” he says. “I was invited to work to teach Bantam and Midget players in the Gatineau area, to prepare them to play in AAA prospect showcase tournaments. But one day, my brother had to close the hockey school program, which came as quite a shock to me… So I took over because I felt it was important to transfer the passion for hockey to these young hockey players.”

After conferring with his wife Joanne, Donald made the decision to form the Flamme Olympique AAA Hockey organization. As Vice-President, she agreed to work with him on developing the talent and passion for hockey in First Nations youths, into participation in AAA tournaments. (Today, this has extended to include all hockey players, so long as they are Canadian citizens).

“I asked Joanne if we should do it. When we decided to start the operation, we ran for only First Nation teams from Novice to Junior levels,” Donald remembers. “We were taking First Nations players, but there were times that, because we were only just starting out, we could not get a full roster, so we would open it out to include non-Native players also. That way, we could get a full roster of 15 skaters and 2 goalies for each team. It worked out well.”

With Joanne’s assistance and Donald’s perseverance, the Flamme Olympique AAA Hockey organization was born, and they were able to transfer their passion and heart for hockey. “The world needs to know what First Nations players can do,” Donald says. “We wanted to provide that opportunity for young players who typically do not get that chance.”

Donald designed the Flamme Olympique AAA Hockey logo, which is beautiful – Olympic torch on a laurel wreath background, symbolizing the sacred Olympic fire burning since ancient times, and triumph in athletic competition, respectively – all ideas worked on with Joanne. “She has a very big role,” Donald explains, “She likes hockey, she has the passion. I am 61 and still playing hockey, and she comes to all of my games and tournaments. She deals with the parents of our Flamme Olympique AAA players, she distributes the jerseys, socks, and jackets…She takes the sizes for fitting for all players. She is really involved; she gives a big helping hand. The parents know that they can always see Joanne, and talk to Joanne, if I am busy coaching on the benches, and then Joanne can always relay information and messages to me.”

This is true fact. Donald and Joanne are both present at each and every game, of each and every tournament, that their teams play in. “We have to be present at all times,” Donald relates.

EARLY CHALLENGES AND SUCCESSES FOR FLAMME OLYMPIQUE AAA

I then ask Donald a question that I notice many others also wonder about: why the focus on First Nation hockey players? I ask Donald, when he first got the idea to commence this Flamme Olympique AAA Hockey initiative: why that particular group of people? The answer is very interesting.

“It took a long time to get First Nation players into the AAA tournaments,” Donald answers, “A lot of people said that First Nation players fight, and that they are bad hockey players in that way. I said to tournament organizers, ‘Please give me that chance. I will make sure that they don’t fight, I will ensure that they are well-disciplined.’ Now, the same tournament organizers ask for my teams in their tournaments. Because First Nation players are not as bad as some people may tend to think. But it was a big challenge in the beginning…There were a lot of people who were scared of the First Nation players.”

Although Donald does not make the statement that racism was there, one can easily surmise that it was. A refreshing, positive view of relationship-building and understanding between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples has been the fortunate result. “I told them, ‘Don’t be like that,’” Donald recalls. “I told them, ‘Give us a chance.’ We proved that it can go in a good way. It was not easy, because sometimes, they can be unhappy when we do beat the top AAA teams.”

Wait a minute here. Beat the top AAA teams?

“Yes, there are those elite AAA teams who have been playing together for 3-4 months, and they have the preparation time, whereas our Flamme Olympique AAA teams are from all across Canada and we don’t have practices or tryouts…but we do have talent and heart.”

Thankfully, it is not all people who feel negatively towards the First Nation players. Many good friendships have been made over the years.  Many people end up realizing that yes, those children and youths do belong in AAA hockey programming also. “If we are called names in tournaments, I do speak to the presidents,” Donald says, “There is a lot of protection with us. We play clean hockey. We have played a lot of tournaments, and our Flamme Olympique AAA teams are admired for their talent and skill, which may be surprising to some people.”

One can see that tenacity and trust are two very important words in Flamme Olympique AAA hockey.

Donald publishes stories and photos on Facebook, and the organization’s reputation has been generated by word of mouth to many different places over the past seven years. Donald and Joanne both conduct their recruitment at major youth hockey tournaments. “That first year, in 2013, we thought that we were only going to be able to have one or two teams. But we ended up having four teams – one in each division [Novice, Atom, Peewee, and Bantam]. The following year, parents of our players asked other parents if their children wanted to play also. So, we then went to have seven teams. After that year, we went to twelve teams, every level, and that is what we still do every year.”

How many players have played for Donald and Joanne’s Flamme Olympique AAA teams since 2013?

“We have had over 700-800 players playing with our organization over the past seven years,” Donald quickly answers, “And some of them will still be playing for us in 2020 and 2021. We have all of the registration done.”

IS THIS “REAL” AAA HOCKEY?

So now, the big question: how successful is Flamme Olympique AAA? We all know that hockey is not all about winning and losing, however it really is nice to win now and then, especially at a level of competition this high.

“In the past seven years, we have completed 52 tournaments,” Donald states, “And out of those 52 tournaments, we have won championships in 22 of them.”

I had to stop writing to take this information in. That is a 42% success rate for championships. Those are pretty darn good odds, considering the fact that Donald’s teams are tournament teams, not expected to even win one game over the established AAA elite teams.

How about any other statistics? I ask for more information. I can tell that this is not what Donald is all about, but it is a question that everyone wants to know.

“Over the past seven years, those 52 tournaments, we have had another 11 teams make it to the finals.” Donald pauses. “And another 8 teams have made it to semi-finals.”

I pause again to absorb this new information. Commendable numbers. Another 21% of his teams are silver medalists, and another 15% make it to play for bronze levels. Altogether, it appears that 71% of his teams have enjoyed winning records.

“Yes, we have had awesome success,” Donald responds, “We beat Gatineau, where I live, in AAA tournaments. People wonder, how do we do this, with no tryouts and no practices?”

“I told them, that with tryouts, people register but then sometimes don’t show up because they may switch to other things to do. It is better to just see the players, and to know them. This makes it easier to recruit. There is no need for tryouts or practices, if we know who the players are.”

But, I ask Donald, is this how he is to know if the players are AA and AAA calibre?

“It can be impossible, when some parents simply do not show up,” Donald replies, “A lot can register, but if we do not know them, then we need to know them first. We check on everyone for sure, because it is very important. We make sure that we have the competent players, to play strong in these AAA tournaments, it is important to choose the right players. Among the younger ones, in Novice there is no AA or AAA, so we do give chances. Some of them are extremely good at A level, and we know they will do well. There is a big checkup with Atom, Peewee, Bantam, and Midget – it is important to have talented players at those levels, because scouts and recruiters are at the tournaments. It is important to have the AA or AAA letters, or be able to play up to that. We recognize that some A players do not have the opportunity to play on AA or AAA teams, yet they certainly are able to play up. We do our research.”

What of the critics or doubters who call this “pretend AAA,” I ask Donald.

“This is not pretending AAA though,” Donald retorts, “People are starting to know us. We travel everywhere. I once drove 15 hours to Chisasibi in northern Quebec. I also drove 24 hours to Labrador. I have recruiters and scouts looking at players in northwestern Ontario. The teams that we play against are all AAA teams, with all AAA players on those teams. But there are also teams that we play against that are AA and AAA players mixed together, and they are in fact real AA and AAA players.”

I am thinking that this question was also already answered, when one considers the fact that 42% of Donald’s teams defeat the “entrenched” AAA teams in championship games. No need to speculate on whether or not this is “pretend.” It most certainly is “real AAA.”

APBM U18 and U20 TEAM CANADA INTERNATIONAL AAA: 2020-2025

Finally, before we are all done, I need to ask Donald: what of this new development known as “APBM U18 and U20 Team Canada International”? Where did the motivation for that come from, and what are the goals and visions for that? Why expand the operation to include Europe (which is so exciting and incredible for young Canadian hockey players)?

“APBM U18 and U20 stands for Atom, Peewee, Bantam, Midget and we have recently added U18 and U20 which is the Junior level,” Donald explains, “to offer young hockey players the chance to be recognized, to have fun in another country, to make new friends and to meet new friends. Our goals are for our players to succeed in their hockey aspirations to stay focused and make it to professional levels someday.”

Donald’s Flamme Olympique AAA Hockey teams are not international, but his APBM U18 and U20 teams are.

“I was offered the opportunity to build teams to represent Canada at the international level. This for sure is real AAA. We will play in the same places that Junior A players play in, such as France, Germany, Czech Republic, Switzerland, Spain, and more. All of the teams there in Europe love Canada, and they want to play against Canadian teams. I was given a five-year mandate.”

Therefore, we can see how Donald has also become the founder of APBM U18 and U20 Team Canada International.

“We added the U18 and U20 after first establishing the APBM levels,” Donald explains, “We are building teams that have to be very good. In some age categories of these tournaments in Europe, there will be six, or eight, and up to even ten teams in the tournament.  This is being done for kids to have a chance; it is the first time in their lives that most of them will have the chance to play against international teams.”

When is Donald’s first trip going to be?

“I am taking a Peewee team in April 2020,” he replies, “and in April and May 2021, we will be taking all levels of APBM, as well as U18 and U20.”

The cost looks to be different for all of the age levels, some higher than others but averaging around $3000. How is this to be paid?

“The organizers originally asked for three payments,” Donald relates, “But we asked if we could have that made as six payments instead, because some people need more time to raise the money.”

What is the level of competition going to be like, I ask Donald. He does not hesitate to answer.

“We have to refuse the registration of non-competitive players,” he says. “We need fast skating (the European ice rinks are 15 feet wider with 2 extra feet behind each net), good stickhandling and above all, the best teamwork. They told me that I am the only organization that will have this privilege – to make Canadian teams to bring to these European AAA tournaments. There will be no other Canadian teams over there. It is a very strong level of play, good hockey, a lot of talented players.”

Donald is confident that his APBM U18 and U20 Team Canada International teams will all be on their best behaviour while in Europe.

“Included in the package is plane fare, accommodations, meals, and a team bus that will be driving parents and players sightseeing as well as to all games. Players will also be provided with jackets, hats, jerseys, and socks. No jeans allowed. We want our players to wear nice shirts and pants, to promote professionalism and respect. No alcohol or drugs of course. Most players will be paired up, to stay with host families, and we will all meet up every morning for breakfast to go to the games. The bus will be ours for the entire stay. All hockey equipment will stay in the bus.”

There is one other question that I need to ask Donald at this point of the interview: a lot of people may not be so comfortable with leaving Canada, as many may not have ever done that before. What will be going on over there in Europe?

“Children will not be without their parents. For the first four days that we are there, our team bus will be taking all of us sightseeing, exploring, and experiencing many places so that our hockey players can meet the people of Europe. The exhibition games and tournament games will start after that. We have a guide over there, in each country, who will take us around on our team bus. Parents, siblings, supporters of our players will be sitting with our players on that bus, wherever we go.  Yes, the players will be paired up and sleeping with billet families at night, but that is only a short time. And the older youths aged U18 and U20 are too old to billet, they will be sleeping three to a hotel room in the local hotels, same as the parents and supporters are.”

Indeed. On Donald’s web site, which administers to both Flamme Olympique AAA and APBM U18 and U20 team registrations, there is a complete itinerary for what the team parents, supporters, and players will be doing – from the time their wheels leave the ground in Canada, to the time they return days and days later. Every day is labeled and scheduled with instructions and directions on where the teams will be going, and what they will be doing at any given time during the European travel, including airplane departures and arrivals, bus travel, where and when they will eat, where and when they will check in to hotels, what types of activities and when and where they will be doing these things. It is all there: visits to famous landmarks, mountain scooter rides, wellness spas for the parents and supporters, bus tours of various cities, shopping, cable car rides, train rides to the Alps mountains to visit glaciers, friendly pool matches, wine tasting for parents/supporters, visits to local chocolate factories and cheese dairies and breweries, tours of local castles, outdoor hot tubs, horseback riding, soccer games, and more (see http://www.apbmteamcanadainternational.com/index.php?page=pages&entity=page&action=show&id=3)

CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL HOCKEY (CIH)

Sounds very professional. When mentioning professional levels, I notice that Donald is involved as a scout, with the Canadian International Hockey (CIH) Academy in Rockland, Ontario which is about 40 kilometres east of Ottawa. What is his role there?

“I can help some players open the door to the CIH Academy,” Donald offers, “It is a big school, with AAA hockey based at the national league. Sometimes we do have the talented kids, but they have to make it through camp. These are Bantam AAA and Midget AA and Midget AAA camps. Going to school, the CIH Academy player would stay there, living there and being on the ice every morning. They play 60 games, and four big showcases. There are easily 100 scouts there from Junior A, to look at our CIH Academy players.”

The CIH Academy sounds like another enhanced step forward for talented young hockey players, and Donald is eager to assist them all.

“It is a professional program,” Donald elaborates, “They do cardio, they have trainers, they have coaches who are from the national league and also from Europe. There are coaches who specialize in training forwards, coaches who specialize in training defencemen, and there are also goalie coaches. I am going on my fourth year working with the CIH Academy. I have scouted twelve players for them, during my time over the past four years. Two of them are now playing at the Junior A level. This is the opportunity that we give them.”

So many connections, so much networking, so much success for our children. Thank you, Donald and Joanne, for all that you do and your hard work to further the dreams and talents of so many children, youth, and young adults. It looks like a lot of fun times ahead.

To connect to Donald Lucas’s APBM U18 and U20 web site, and to register for either Flamme Olympique AAA or APBM U18 and U20, please consult the following Internet link:

http://www.apbmteamcanadainternational.com/

Équipe Flamme Olympique Hockey Élite AAA  (Niveaux: Novice-Pee wee-Bantam-Midget-Junior)

Équipe APBM Team Canada International

 Niveaux (U11 Atome)-(U13 Pee wee)-(U15 Bantam)-(U17 Midget) et (U18-U20 Juniors)

En route (en avion) avec Donald Lucas et des jeunes Canadiens de l’Ontario et du Québec pour l’ Europe

Donald Lucas, Fondateur de Flamme Olympique Hockey (basé à Gatineau, Québec) est un homme en mission. Au cours des sept dernières années, il a consacré la majeure partie de son temps aux joueurs de hockey de niveau novice à junior (âgés de 7 à 21 ans), pour faire avancer leur carrière et leurs aspirations pour le hockey.

J’ai eu l’occasion de m’asseoir récemment avec Donald, de faire une entrevue avec lui, dans l’espoir d’éclairer sa vision et ses objectifs pour l’opération de hockey dans laquelle il est impliqué depuis 2013 avec sa femme, Joanne Villeneuve. Donald et Joanne se dévouent sans cesse pour créer des opportunités pour les joueurs de hockey de niveau A- AA et AAA. Ce sont tous deux des gens très gentils, accessibles, très astucieux et bien informés sur les enfants, les adolescents et les jeunes adultes qui pratiquent le hockey.

LES PREMIÈRES ANNÉES D’ÉLITE AAA DE FLAMME OLYMPIQUE HOCKEY

Pourquoi Donald a-t-il commencé à faire cela en 2013? Quelle était sa motivation?

«J’ai un frère cadet qui a dirigé une école de hockey pendant cinq ans, à partir de 2007», dit-il. «J’ai été invitée à travailler pour enseigner aux joueurs Bantam et Midget de la région de Gatineau, afin de les préparer à jouer dans des tournois  Showcase de compétition AAA. Mais un jour, mon frère a dû fermer le programme de l’école de hockey, ce qui a été un choc pour moi… J’ai donc pris la relève, car je pensais qu’il était important de transmettre la passion du hockey à ces jeunes joueurs de hockey. »

Après s’être entretenu avec son épouse Joanne, Donald a pris la décision de former l’organisation de Flamme Olympique Hockey. À titre de vice-présidente, elle a accepté de travailler avec lui pour développer le talent et la passion pour le hockey chez les jeunes des Premières Nations, en vue de participer à des tournois ÉLITE AAA et AAA. (Aujourd’hui, cela s’est étendu à tous les joueurs de hockey, tant qu’ils sont citoyens canadiens).

 «J’ai demandé à Joanne si nous devions le faire. Lorsque nous avons décidé de lancer l’opération, nous ne courions que pour les équipes des Premières nations, de  niveaux novice à junior », se souvient Donald. «Nous prenions des joueurs des Premières Nations, mais il y avait des moments où, comme nous ne faisions que commencer, nous ne pouvions pas obtenir une liste complète, donc nous avons invité également des joueurs non autochtones. De cette façon, nous pourrions obtenir une liste complète de 15 patineurs et 2 gardiens de but pour chaque équipe. Cela a bien fonctionné. »

Avec l’aide de Joanne et la persévérance de Donald, l’organisation de hockey Flamme Olympique Hockey de niveau AAA Élite est née et elle a pu transférer sa passion et son cœur pour le hockey. «Le monde a besoin de savoir ce que les joueurs des Premières Nations peuvent faire», a déclaré Donald. “Nous voulions offrir cette opportunité aux jeunes joueurs qui généralement n’ont pas cette chance.”

Donald a conçu le logo Flamme Olympique AAA , qui est magnifique – torche Olympique sur un fond de couronne de laurier, symbolisant le feu sacré Olympique brûlant depuis les temps anciens, et triomphant en compétition sportive, respectivement – toutes les idées ont travaillé avec Joanne. «Elle a un très grand rôle», explique Donald. «Elle aime le hockey, elle a la passion. J’ai 61 ans et je joue toujours au hockey, et elle vient à tous mes joutes  et tournois. Elle s’occupe des parents de nos joueurs de Flamme Olympique AAA, elle distribue les chandails, les bas et les manteaux… Elle prend les tailles pour s’adapter à tous les joueurs. Elle est vraiment impliquée; elle donne un gros coup de main. Les parents savent qu’ils peuvent toujours voir Joanne et parler à Joanne, si je suis occupé à entraîner sur le banc, et alors Joanne peut toujours me transmettre des informations et des messages. »

C’est vrai. Donald et Joanne sont tous les deux présents à chaque joute, à chaque tournoi auquel jouent leurs équipes. «Nous devons être présents à tout moment», raconte Donald.

DÉFIS ET RÉUSSITES ANTICIPÉS POUR FLAMME OLYMPIQUE AAA

Je pose ensuite à Donald une question sur laquelle je m’interroge et que beaucoup d’autres se demandent également: pourquoi se concentrer sur les joueurs de hockey des Premières Nations? Je demande à Donald, quand il a eu l’idée de lancer cette initiative de hockey Flamme Olympique AAA: pourquoi ce groupe de personnes en particulier? La réponse est très intéressante.

«Il a fallu beaucoup de temps pour amener les joueurs des Premières Nations aux tournois AAA», répond Donald. «Beaucoup de gens ont dit que les joueurs des Premières nations se battent et qu’ils sont de mauvais joueurs de hockey de cette façon. J’ai dit à tous les organisateurs des tournois: «Donnez-moi cette chance. Je veillerai à ce qu’ils ne se battent pas, je veillerai à ce qu’ils soient bien disciplinés. »Maintenant, les mêmes organisateurs des tournois demandent mes équipes dans leurs tournois. Parce que les joueurs des Premières Nations ne sont pas aussi mauvais que certains le pensent. Mais c’était un grand défi au début… Il y avait beaucoup de gens qui avaient peur des joueurs des Premières Nations. »

Bien que Donald ne déclare pas que le racisme était là, on peut facilement supposer qu’il l’était. Une vision positive et rafraîchissante de l’établissement de relations et de la compréhension entre les peuples autochtones et non autochtones a été le résultat heureux. “Je leur ai dit:” Ne soyez pas comme ça “”, se souvient Donald. “Je leur ai dit:” Donnez-nous une chance. “Nous avons prouvé que cela peut aller dans le bon sens. Cela n’a pas été facile, car parfois, ils peuvent être mécontents lorsque nous battons les meilleures équipes AAA. »

Attendez une minute ici. Battre les meilleures équipes AAA?

«Oui, il y a ces équipes d’élite AAA qui jouent ensemble depuis 3-4 mois, et elles ont le temps de préparation, alors que nos équipes Flamme Olympique AAA sont de partout au Canada et nous n’avons pas d’entraînement ou d’essais… mais nous avons du talent et du cœur. »

Heureusement, ce ne sont pas tous les gens qui ont une opinion négative envers les joueurs des Premières Nations. De nombreuses bonnes amitiés se sont nouées au fil des ans. Beaucoup de gens finissent par se rendre compte que oui, ces enfants et ces jeunes font également partie des programmes de hockey AAA. “Si nous sommes appelés des noms dans les tournois, je parle aux présidents”, dit Donald, “Il y a beaucoup de protection avec nous. Nous jouons au hockey propre. Nous avons joué beaucoup de tournois, et nos équipes Flamme Olympique AAA sont admirées pour leur talent et leurs compétences, ce qui peut surprendre certaines personnes.

On peut voir que la ténacité et la confiance sont deux mots très importants dans le hockey Flamme Olympique AAA.

Donald publie des histoires et des photos sur Facebook, et la réputation de l’organisation a été générée par le bouche à oreille dans de nombreux endroits différents au cours des sept dernières années. Donald et Joanne effectuent tous les deux leurs recrutements lors de tournois mineurs et majeurs de hockey pour les jeunes. «Cette première année, en 2013, nous pensions que nous allions pouvoir former qu’une ou deux équipes. Mais nous avons réussi à former quatre équipes – une dans chaque division [Novice, Atome, Peewee et Bantam]. L’année suivante, nous avons fait beaucoup de route pour participer à des tournois de Premières Nations pour faire du recrutement  et aussi les parents de nos joueurs ont demandé à d’autres parents si leurs enfants voulaient jouer aussi. Nous avons donc réussi de former sept équipes. Après l’année suivante, nous avons réussi de former douze équipes, à tous les niveaux, et c’est ce que nous faisons encore chaque année. »

Combien de joueurs ont joué pour les équipes Flamme Olympique AAA de Donald et Joanne depuis 2013?

«Nous avons eu plus de 700 à 800 joueurs jouant avec notre organisation au cours des sept dernières années», répond rapidement Donald.  «Et certains d’entre eux joueront toujours pour nous en 2020 et 2021. Nous avons plusieurs inscription déjà effectués dans toutes les niveaux pour 2020 et 2021.»

EST-CE «LE VRAI» HOCKEY AAA?

Alors maintenant, la grande question: quel est le succès du Flamme Olympique AAA?

Nous savons tous que le hockey ne consiste pas uniquement à gagner et à perdre, mais c’est vraiment agréable de gagner de temps en temps, surtout à un niveau de compétition aussi élevé.

“Au cours des sept dernières années, nous avons terminé 52 tournois”, confirme Donald, “Et sur ces 52 tournois, nous avons remporté 22 championnats.»

J’ai dû arrêter d’écrire pour prendre cette information. C’est un taux de réussite de 42% pour les championnats. Ce sont de très bonnes chances, compte tenu du fait que les équipes de Donald sont des équipes de tournoi, qui ne devraient même pas gagner un match contre les équipes d’élite AAA établies.

Que diriez-vous d’autres statistiques? Je demande plus d’informations. Je peux dire que ce n’est pas de cela qu’il s’agit, mais c’est une question que tout le monde veut savoir.

“Au cours des sept dernières années, ces 52 tournois, nous avons eu 11 autres équipes se rendre à la finale.” Donald s’arrête.

“Et 8 autres équipes ont atteint les demi-finales.”

Je m’arrête à nouveau pour absorber ces nouvelles informations. Des chiffres louables. Un autre 21% de ses équipes sont médaillés d’argent, et 15% de plus parviennent à jouer pour le bronze. Au total, il apparaît que 71% de ses équipes ont apprécié de remporter des records. 

«Oui, nous avons eu un succès incroyable», répond Donald, «Nous avons gagné contre plusieurs équipes du Québec et Ontario, dans les tournois AAA. Les gens se demandent comment faire cela, sans essais (try-out) ni pratiques? »

«Je leur ai dit qu’avec les essais, les gens s’inscrivent mais parfois ne se présentent pas car ils peuvent passer à autre chose. Il vaut mieux simplement de faire du recrutement dans des tournois pour voir les joueurs et les connaître. Cela facilite le recrutement. Il n’y a pas besoin d’essais ou de pratiques, si nous savons qui sont les joueurs. »

Mais, je demande à Donald, est-ce ainsi qu’il doit savoir si les joueurs sont de calibre A- AA et AAA?

«Cela peut être impossible, lorsque certains parents ne se présentent tout simplement pas», répond Donald, «Beaucoup peuvent s’inscrire, mais si nous ne les connaissons pas, nous devons d’abord les connaître. Nous vérifions tout le monde à coup sûr, car c’est très important. Nous nous assurons que nous avons les joueurs compétents, pour jouer dans ces tournois AAA compétitif, il est important de choisir les bons joueurs. Chez les plus jeunes dans la catégorie novice, il n’y a pas du AA et AAA, donc nous donnons des chances. Certains d’entre eux sont extrêmement bons au niveau A, et nous savons qu’ils s’en tireront bien. Il y a un gros bilan avec Atome, Peewee, Bantam, Midget et Junior – il est important d’avoir des joueurs talentueux à ces niveaux, car il y a des dépisteurs aux tournois. Il est important d’avoir les lettres AA ou AAA pouvoir participer à ce niveau. Nous reconnaissons que certains joueurs A n’ont pas la possibilité de jouer dans des équipes AA ou AAA, mais ils sont certainement capables de jouer. Nous faisons nos recherches. »

Qu’en est-il des critiques ou des sceptiques qui appellent cela «faire semblant AAA», je demande à Donald.

«Ce n’est pas prétendre que AAA», rétorque Donald, «Les gens commencent à nous connaître. Nous voyageons partout. Une fois, j’ai conduit 15 heures à Chisasibi, dans le nord du Québec. J’ai également conduit 24 heures au Labrador. J’ai des recruteurs et des éclaireurs au Québec et Ontario qui cherchent des joueurs. Les équipes contre lesquelles nous jouons sont de vrai  équipes AAA, avec tous des joueurs AAA. Mais il y a aussi des équipes contre lesquelles nous jouons qui sont des joueurs AA et AAA mélangés ensemble, et ce sont en fait de vrais joueurs AA et AAA. »

Je pense que cette question a également déjà été répondue, si l’on considère le fait que 42% des équipes de Donald battent les équipes AAA «retranchées» dans les matchs de championnat. Inutile de spéculer sur le fait de savoir si c’est de la “simulation”. Il s’agit très certainement de “vrais AAA”.

APBM Team Canada International  

(U11 Atome)-(U13 Pee wee)-(U15 Bantam)-(U17 Midget) et (U18-U20 Juniors)

Enfin, avant que nous ayons tous terminé, je dois demander à Donald: qu’en est-il de ce nouveau développement appelé «APBM Team Canada International»? D’où vient la motivation pour cela, et quels sont les objectifs et les visions pour cela? Pourquoi étendre l’opération à l’Europe (ce qui est si excitant et incroyable pour les jeunes joueurs de hockey canadiens)? «APBM Team Canada International signifie  (U11 Atome)-(U13 Pee wee)-(U15 Bantam)-(U17 Midget) et nous avons récemment ajouté (U18-U20 qui est le niveau junior», explique Donald, «pour offrir aux jeunes joueurs de hockey la chance d’être reconnus, de s’amuser dans un autre pays. , pour se faire de nouveaux amis et rencontrer de nouveaux amis. Nos objectifs sont que nos joueurs réussissent dans leurs aspirations de hockey à rester concentrés et à atteindre le niveau professionnel un jour. »

 Mais, je demande à Donald, est-ce ainsi qu’il doit savoir si les joueurs sont de calibre A- AA et AAA? «Cela peut être impossible, lorsque certains parents ne se présentent tout simplement pas», répond Donald, «Beaucoup peuvent s’inscrire, mais si nous ne les connaissons pas, nous devons d’abord les connaître. Nous vérifions tout le monde à coup sûr, car c’est très important. Nous nous assurons que nous avons les joueurs compétents, pour jouer dans ces tournois AAA compétitif, il est important de choisir les bons joueurs. Chez les plus jeunes dans la catégorie novice, il n’y a pas de AA et AAA, donc nous donnons des chances. Certains d’entre eux sont extrêmement bons au niveau A, et nous savons qu’ils s’en tireront bien. Il y a un gros bilan avec Atome, Peewee, Bantam, Midget et Junior – il est important d’avoir des joueurs talentueux à ces niveaux, car il y a des dépisteurs aux tournois. Il est important d’avoir les lettres AA ou AAA pouvoir participer à ce niveau. Nous reconnaissons que certains joueurs A n’ont pas la possibilité de jouer dans des équipes AA ou AAA, mais ils sont certainement capables de jouer. Nous faisons nos recherches. »

Qu’en est-il des critiques ou des sceptiques qui appellent cela «faire semblant AAA», je demande à Donald.

«Ce n’est pas prétendre que AAA», rétorque Donald, «Les gens commencent à nous connaître. Nous voyageons partout. Une fois, j’ai conduit 15 heures à Chisasibi, dans le nord du Québec. J’ai également conduit 24 heures au Labrador. J’ai des recruteurs et des éclaireurs qui cherchent des joueurs dans le nord-ouest de l’Ontario. Les équipes contre lesquelles nous jouons sont de vrai  équipes AAA, avec tous des joueurs AAA. Mais il y a aussi des équipes contre lesquelles nous jouons qui sont des joueurs AA et AAA mélangés ensemble, et ce sont en fait de vrais joueurs AA et AAA. »

Je pense que cette question a également déjà été répondue, si l’on considère le fait que 42% des équipes de Donald battent les équipes AAA «retranchées» dans les matchs de championnat. Inutile de spéculer sur le fait de savoir si c’est de la “simulation”. Il s’agit très certainement de “vrais AAA”.

APBM Team Canada International   

(U11 Atome)-(U13 Pee wee)-(U15 Bantam)-(U17 Midget) et (U18-U20 Juniors)

Nous jouerons aux mêmes endroits que les joueurs junior A, comme la France, l’Allemagne, la République tchèque, la Suisse, l’Espagne, etc. Toutes les équipes en Europe aiment le Canada et veulent jouer contre des équipes canadiennes. Je me suis mandaté pour cinq ans. (2020 à 2024)»  Par conséquent, nous pouvons voir comment Donald est également devenu le fondateur des équipes APBM Team Canada International. «Nous avons ajouté les U18 et U20 de niveaux Junior après avoir d’abord établi les niveaux APBM»(U11 Atome)-(U13 Pee-wee)-(U15 Bantam)-(U17 Midget), explique Donald, «Nous formons des équipes qui doivent être très compétitifs. Dans certaines catégories d’âge de ces tournois en Europe, il y aura six, huit, ou 10 et même jusqu’à douze équipes dans le tournoi. Cela se fait pour que les enfants aient une chance; c’est la première fois de leur vie que la plupart d’entre eux auront la chance de jouer contre des équipes internationales. »

Quand aura lieu le premier voyage de Donald?

«Je quitte avec seulement une équipe Pee wee (U13) en avril 2020 car nous avons accepté l’offre en Novembre 2019 et nous avions eux seulement 5 mois de préparation et habituellement pour tous les niveaux ça prend au moins un ans de préparation», répond-il, «et pour participer en avril et mai 2021, nous formerons tous les niveaux ATOME (U11)-Pee wee (U13)-Bantam (U15)-Midget (U17), ainsi que Junior U18 et U20 au début de l’année  2020»

Le coût semble différent pour tous les niveaux d’âge, certains plus élevés que d’autres

Comment cela doit-il être payé?

«Les organisateurs ont initialement demandé trois paiements», raconte Donald, «mais nous avons demandé si nous pouvions faire cela en six paiements d’une période de un ans, car certaines personnes ont besoin de plus de temps pour des levées de fonds.»

Quel sera le niveau de compétition, je demande à Donald. Il n’hésite pas à répondre.

“Nous devons refuser l’enregistrement des joueurs non compétitifs”, dit-il. «Nous avons besoin de patineur très rapide (les patinoires européennes sont 15 pieds plus larges avec 2 pieds supplémentaires derrière chaque filet), une bonne maniabilité du bâton et surtout de travailler très fort en équipe. Ils m’ont avisé que je suis la seule organisation qui aura ce privilège de faire participer des équipes canadiennes à ces tournois International Européens. Il n’y aura pas d’autres équipes canadiennes là-bas. C’est un très bon niveau de jeu, du bon hockey, beaucoup de joueurs talentueux. »

Donald est confiant que ses équipes  (U11 Atome)-(U13 Pee wee)-(U15 Bantam)-(U17 Midget) -(U18 et U20 Juniors)                                                 APBM Team Canada International seront toutes sur leur meilleur comportement en Europe.

«Le forfait comprend le prix de l’avion, l’hébergement, des repas et un autobus d’équipe qui conduira les parents et les joueurs à la visite ainsi qu’à tous les joutes. Les joueurs recevront également un gilet, bas, casquette et manteau de APBM Team Canada International. Aucun jeans n’est autorisé. Nous voulons que nos joueurs portent de jolis chemises et pantalons, pour promouvoir le professionnalisme et le respect. Pas d’alcool ni de drogues bien sûr. La plupart des joueurs de niveaux Atome-Pee wee-Bantam seront jumelés pour rester dans des familles d’accueil, et de niveaux Midget et Junior seront jumelés 3 par chambre de hôtel nous nous retrouverons chaque matin pour le petit déjeuner pour visiter et  aller aux joutes avec notre autobus et guide. Le bus sera à nous pour tout le séjour. Tout l’équipement de hockey restera dans l’autobus. » Il y a une autre question que je dois poser à Donald à ce stade de l’entrevue: beaucoup de gens ne sont peut-être pas aussi à l’aise de quitter le Canada, comme beaucoup ne l’ont peut-être jamais fait auparavant. Que va-t-il se passer là-bas en Europe

«Les enfants ne seront pas sans leurs parents. Pendant les quatre premiers jours de notre séjour, notre autobus et guide d’équipe nous emmènerons à visiter, explorer et découvrir de nombreux endroits afin que nos joueurs de hockey puissent rencontrer les Européens. Les matchs hors concours et les tournois commenceront après cela. Nous avons un guide à toutes les jours, qui nous emmènera dans notre autobus d’équipe. Les parents, les frères et sœurs, les supporteurs de nos joueurs et le guide seront assis avec nos joueurs dans l’autobus, où que nous allions. Oui, les joueurs de niveaux Atome-Pee wee-Bantam seront jumelés et dormiront avec des familles d’accueil la nuit, mais ce n’est que peu de temps. Et les jeunes plus âgés de niveaux U17 Midget et U18-U20 Juniors ils dormiront trois dans une chambre d’hôtel dans les hôtels locaux, tout comme les parents et les supporters.
En effet. Sur le site Web de Donald, qui gère les inscriptions des équipes Flamme Olympique AAA et APBM Team Canada International il y a un itinéraire complet pour ce que les parents, les supporteurs et les joueurs de l’équipe feront – à partir du moment où leurs roues quitteront le sol au Canada, au moment où ils reviennent des jours et des jours plus tard. Chaque jour est étiqueté et programmé avec des instructions et des directions sur où les équipes iront et ce qu’elles feront à tout moment pendant le voyage en Europe, y compris les départs et arrivées en avion, les voyages en autobus, où et quand ils mangeront, où et quand ils seront dans les hôtels, quels types d’activités et quand et où ils feront ces choses. Tout y est: visites le sites célèbres, balades en scooter de montagne, spas de bien-être pour les parents et les supporters, visites en bus de différentes villes, shopping, promenades en téléphérique, promenades en train dans les Alpes pour visiter les glaciers, matchs de piscine conviviaux, dégustation de vins pour les parents / supporters, visites des chocolateries locales et des fromageries et brasseries, visites des châteaux locaux, bains à remous extérieurs, équitation, matchs de football, etc. S’il vous plaît noter bien que les activitées sont pas les mêmes pour toutes les niveaux. (voir http://www.apbmteamcanadainternational.com/

 HOCKEY INTERNATIONAL CANADIEN (CIH)

Cela semble très professionnel. En mentionnant les niveaux professionnels, je remarque que Donald est impliqué comme éclaireur à l’Académie canadienne de hockey international (CIH) à Rockland, en Ontario, à environ 40 kilomètres à l’est d’Ottawa. Quel est son rôle là-bas?

 «Je peux aider certains joueurs à ouvrir la porte de l’Académie CIH», propose Donald. «C’est une grande école, avec le hockey AAA. Parfois, nous avons des enfants talentueux, mais ils doivent passer le camp. Ce sont les camps Bantam AAA, Midget AA et Midget AAA. Pour aller à l’école, les joueurs qui sont acceptés à l’Académie CIH doit demeurer sur le site, toutes les matins et après l’École pour étudier.  Ils jouent 60 matchs et quatre tournois Showcase. Il y a facilement 100 éclaireurs de niveaux collégial et  Junior pour regarder nos joueurs de l’Académie CIH dans les tournois Showcase »

 L’Académie CIH ressemble à un autre pas en avant amélioré pour les jeunes joueurs de hockey talentueux, et Donald est impatient de les aider tous.

«C’est un programme professionnel», précise Donald, «Ils font du cardio, ils ont des entraîneurs qui ont joué dans la ligue nationale et aussi en Europe. Il y a des entraîneurs qui se spécialisent dans la formation des attaquants, des entraîneurs qui se spécialisent dans la formation des défenseurs, et il y a aussi des entraîneurs de gardiens. Je passe ma quatrième année à travailler avec l’Académie CIH. J’ai repéré douze joueurs pour eux, pendant mon temps au cours des quatre dernières années. Deux d’entre eux jouent maintenant au niveau Junior A. C’est l’occasion que nous leur donnons. »

Tant de connexions, tant de réseautage, tant de succès pour nos enfants. Merci, Donald et Joanne, pour tout ce que vous faites et votre travail acharné pour réaliser les rêves et les talents de tant d’enfants, de jeunes et de jeunes adultes. Cela ressemble à beaucoup de moments amusants à venir. Pour vous connecter au site Web APBM Team Canada International (U11 Atome)-(U13 Pee wee)-(U15 Bantam)-(U17 Midget) -(U18 et U20 Juniors) de Donald Lucas et pour vous inscrire à Flamme Olympique AAA ou APBM U11-U13-U15-U17- U18 et U20, veuillez consulter le lien Internet suivant:

http://www.apbmteamcanadainternational.com/

 

Previous articleCoronavirus Update – Toronto – Statement from Dr. Eileen de Villa
Next articleUpdate on blockade at the Marten Falls FN Band Office
Peter Rasevych is a Ginoogaming First Nation band member who also has family roots in Long Lake #58 First Nation, as well as Fort William First Nation. He is an avid trapper, fisherman, and hunter on his family’s traditional territory near Longlac, in northwestern Ontario. He is also a fully licensed children’s hockey, soccer, and lacrosse coach. He was born in Toronto, Ontario and was raised there as well as in Montreal, Quebec. As a youth, Peter attended high school in the Town of Pickering (near Toronto) as well as at Riverdale High School (in Montreal). He graduated from John Abbott College (a CEGEP in Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec) with a DEC (Diploma D’Etudes Collegiales) in Social Sciences after studying there from 1989-91. He attained Honour Roll status for three of his four semesters there. He was then awarded with a Bachelor of Arts Degree (BA in English) from McGill University (Montreal) in 1994, after three years of study there. After travelling across Canada and living and working in the bush, he later attended Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, where he graduated with an Honours Bachelor of Arts (HBA in English) in 1998, as well as a Master’s Degree (MA in English) in 2001, where he completed a thesis which was published by the National Library of Canada. Peter’s research focus on traditional First Nations spiritual values, beliefs and culture led him to pursue a PhD in Natural Resources Management at Lakehead University from 2009-12. His research was centred on traditional Anishnawbe spiritual knowledge as it relates to the land, water, and animals. He has also worked for many years in First Nations community development, education, and human and social development at the local band office level on Ginoogaming First Nation, as well as at the tribal council level (Matawa First Nations), and also at the provincial territorial level (OSHKI, for Nishnawbe-Aski Nation). He has taught post-secondary courses for Confederation College (Negahneewin College) in Thunder Bay, in addition to instructing for courses at Lakehead University (Indigenous Learning, English, and Social Work). In addition to articles, his writing interests include research reports, essays, and creative outlets such as short stories, poetry, songs, and short novels. His interests include traditional Anishnawbe spirituality, and camping/living out in the bush as he has done with family since the age of 4.