OPP Update – June 21, 2018

Regional Crime Update
Regional Crime Report

THUNDER BAY – NEWS – The Ontario Provincial Police were busy over the past 36 hours. Here are some of the incidents that they dealt with over the past day and a half.

FORT FRANCES – On June 20, 2018, at approximately 11:22 AM, members of the Rainy River District Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) Detachment were dispatched to a 911 call of a robbery in progress at a local business. The suspect was wielding a weapon at the time of the robbery. All available officers immediately attended the area of the business and conducted patrols for the suspect. The suspect was located by officers a short distance from the business, where he was taken into police custody. No one was injured during the robbery.

A Fort Frances man, Chauncey GROVER, 29 years of age is facing the following charges:

  1. Robbery with Weapon contrary to section 34(1)(b) of the Criminal Code,
  2. Possession of Property Obtained by Crime contrary to section 354(1)(a) of the Criminal Code,
  3. Possession of Weapon for Dangerous Purpose contrary to section 88 of the Criminal Code.

The accused is being held in custody pending a bail hearing at the Fort Frances Ontario Court of Justice on June 21, 2018.


NIPIGON – The Nipigon Ontario Provincial Police (OPP), Crime Unit, and the Community Street Crime Unit (CSCU), commenced an investigation into sales of cocaine and heroin in the Nipigon area. As a result of the investigation, on Tuesday the 20th of June 2018 a search was conducted at a Nipigon residence. Officers located a quantity of suspected cocaine, suspected heroin and a quantity of cash. The estimated street value of drugs seized is $47,500.

Andrian Hyatt, 35 years of age, of no fixed address, formerly of Scarborough, ON, has been charged with the following offences:

1. Possession of cocaine for the Purpose of Trafficking contrary to section 5(2) of the CDSA.

2. Possession of heroin for the Purpose of Trafficking contrary to section 5(2) of the CDSA.,

3. Possession Property Obtained by Crime Under $5000 contrary to section 354(1)(a) of the Criminal Code,

Hyatt has been remanded into custody.


FORT FRANCES, ON – On June 11, 2018, at approximately 12:03 AM, members of the Rainy River District Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) Detachment were dispatched to a report of an altercation on Third Street East in Fort Frances. An investigation was commenced. Two male parties received minor injuries as a result of the incident.

As a result of the investigation, a Fort Frances man, Jacob JONES, 21 years of age, is facing a charge of Assault with a Weapon contrary to section 267(1)(a) of the Criminal Code.

The accused was released on a Promise to Appear and is scheduled to appear in Fort Frances at the Ontario Court of Justice on the 30th of July 2018 in answer to the charges.


FORT FRANCES – The Rainy River District Detachment of the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) wish to remind motorists that cycling is a fun and healthy activity, and it’s a low-cost way to get around. It’s also good for the environment. Before heading out on a bike, ensure that you learn the rules of the road, helmet information and safety tips for cyclists of all ages.Rules of the Road: As a cyclist, you must share the road with other (e.g. cars, buses, trucks, and motorcycles). Under the Ontario Highway Traffic Act (HTA), a bicycle is a vehicle, just like a car or truck. Please visit the Ontario Ministry of Transportation to view the Ontario Guide to Safe Cycling at http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/safety/bicycle-safety.shtml for more information.

Rules of the Road: As a cyclist, you must share the road with other (e.g. cars, buses, trucks, and motorcycles). Under the Ontario Highway Traffic Act (HTA), a bicycle is a vehicle, just like a car or truck. Please visit the Ontario Ministry of Transportation to view the Ontario Guide to Safe Cycling at www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/safety/bicycle-safety.shtml for more information.

As it is for cyclists, it is equally important for drivers of motor vehicles to ensure that they share the roadway. Under the Ontario HTA, drivers must leave a minimum of one-metre distance when passing a cyclist. Do not follow too closely behind cyclists. They do not have brake lights to warn you when they are slowing or stopping. To avoid collisions with bicyclists at intersections, remember the following:

  • When turning right, signal and check your mirrors and the blind spot to your right to make sure you do not cut off a cyclist.
  • When turning left, you must stop and wait for oncoming bicycles to pass before turning.
  • When driving through an intersection, be careful to scan for cyclists waiting to turn left.

Under the Ontario Highway Traffic Act, cyclists, motorists and pedestrians have equal rights and access to our roadways. All users have to share the road; share the respect.


Watercycle Rules and Safety Guidelines

With the nice weather in place, more people are hitting the lakes and enjoying water-related activities and pleasure craft. Stand-up paddleboards are more common today than they’ve ever been.  The East Algoma Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) would like to remind citizens to have a safe and enjoyable summer season on the water.

Stand-up paddleboarding is a paddling activity whereby the operator navigates standing on a surfboard and uses a paddle. Stand-up paddleboarding evolved out of surfing and has become a means of navigation on water bodies across Canada, including rivers, lakes, and oceans. There are rigid plastic and inflatable models.

Did you know:

As a relatively new type of small vessel, stand-up paddleboards are not specifically referenced in the Regulations and are therefore treated the same as other human-powered pleasure craft (e.g. sit-on-top kayaks, canoes), with the same safety equipment carriage requirements. When used for navigation, stand-up paddleboards must be equipped with the following: an approved personal flotation device or lifejacket, 15 m of buoyant heaving line, a sound-signalling device (e.g. a whistle), navigation lights (if the vessel is operated between sunset and sunrise), and a magnetic compass when operated beyond sight of seamarks. Non-navigation activities are not subject to the mandatory carriage of safety equipment (e.g. surfing, stand-up paddleboard yoga).

In practice, the operation of stand-up paddleboards is similar to the operation of sit-on-top kayaks and other sealed-hull vessels. Currently, an exception is provided under the Regulations, stating that if every person on board a paddleboat, a water-cycle or sealed-hull, sit-on-top kayak is wearing a personal flotation device or lifejacket of an appropriate size, the paddleboat, watercycle or kayak is required to carry on board only a sound-signalling device and, if the paddleboat, watercycle or kayak is operated after sunset or before sunrise or in periods of restricted visibility, a watertight flashlight. The exemption removes the requirement to carry 15 m of buoyant heaving line and motivates the wearing of personal flotation devices or lifejackets.