Safe Water Project Minimizing and Preventing Boil Water Advisories

Posted 13 August 2015 by in Business

Water Treatment

Keewaytinook Okimakanak demonstrates clean water project in Dryden

Keewaytinook Okimakanak resolving drinking water issues

DRYDEN, ON – BUSINESS –  Keewaytinook Okimakanak today demonstrated at an Open House in Dryden on Wednesday, at the Keewaytinook Centre of Excellence its latest water and wastewater initiative, the Safe Water Project, which is helping deliver clean, safe drinking water to its First Nation communities.

“On behalf of our Chiefs, I am pleased to present the Safe Water Project, a new and innovative approach that is addressing the challenge of delivering safe, clean drinking water to First Nations communities,” said Geordi Kakepetum, chief executive director of Keewaytinook Okimakanak. “The Project is empowering our communities to effectively monitor and manage the quality of their drinking water, and in doing so, is instilling confidence in our water system and hope for future generations. We believe that by demonstrating the success of the Safe Water Project in minimizing and preventing boil water advisories, we can help other communities and municipalities address their own water issues.”

Providing clean drinking water for Northern Communities will save money and improve living standards

Providing clean drinking water for Northern Communities will save money and improve living standards

The Safe Water Project involves employing operational personnel to supervise and support local water plant operators and deploying remote water quality monitoring technology to assist in the diagnosis and treatment of drinking water. While it is the first of its kind for any Tribal Council in Ontario, the Safe Water Project is just the latest success for Keewaytinook Okimakanak, an organization well known for providing a range of services to Aboriginal and non-­‐Aboriginal communities in and around Ontario.

About Keewaytinook Okimakanak

Keewaytinook Okimakanak, which means Northern Chiefs in Oji-­‐Cree, is a non-­‐political Chiefs Council serving Deer Lake, Fort Severn, Keewaywin, McDowell Lake, North Spirit Lake and Poplar Hill First Nations. The organization is directed by the Chiefs of the member First Nations, who form the Board of Directors. Through its close awareness of community needs and its team approach, the Council advises and assists its member First Nations, and provides services in the areas of health, education, economic development, employment assistance, public works, finance and administration, and communications.

Centre of Excellence in Dryden

Keewaytinook Okimakanak Centre of Excellence in Dryden