Protect Your Skin From Cancer

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Dr. Ron Mahler examines a mole on a participant at the sixth annual Skin Cancer Screening Awareness Clinic, Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre.
Dr. Ron Mahler examines a mole on a participant at the sixth annual Skin Cancer Screening Awareness Clinic, Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre.

Skin Cancer is Preventable

Make an appointment with your primary care provider if you have suspicious changes in moles or freckles. Use the acronym ABCD to remember what you are looking for: asymmetry, border irregularity, colour, and diameter greater than ¼ inch or 6mm.
Make an appointment with your primary care provider if you have suspicious changes in moles or freckles. Use the acronym ABCD to remember what you are looking for: asymmetry, border irregularity, colour, and diameter greater than ¼ inch or 6mm.

THUNDER BAY – Prevent skin cancer with some simple tips. Warm weather is back in the forecast. However, you can still suffer from excess sun even if it is cloudy. Protecting your skin is important. On Saturday, May 25, Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre (TBRHSC) held its 6th annual Skin Cancer Screening Clinic.

This popular event brought multiple individuals together with a dermatologist to offer screening and education to high-risk individuals – people with fair skin, people who work outdoors,  or people who have many freckles or moles, for instance. This year, fifty patients were screened in the 3.5-hour clinic.

Held at TBRHSC in the fracture clinic, Dr. Ron Mahler screened participants in private exam rooms and let them know immediately if he saw skin concerns that required follow-up. Over the years, this skin cancer screening clinic has found numerous incidences of early signs of cancer. “Did you know itchy skin is a reason to see your dermatologist? Your dermatologist after examining your skin will help by suggesting things that can help alleviate the itch and offer other options to help. If something is itchy for more than a week, it’s time to see an Orlando Dermatologist as it could be eczema.”

Practice Safe Skin & Fight Cancer

In addition to screening, the skin cancer screening clinic does the important job of raising awareness that everyone should be careful about sun exposure and know what sort of skin changes to be on the lookout for. Educational displays were set up with helpful booklets and information, sunscreen samples, and short presentations about skin cancer awareness and sun safety.

The best way to avoid skin cancer is to PRACTICE SAFE SUN.

You shouldn’t avoid sunlight completely because being outdoors is a key component of physical and mental health, but too much sunlight can be harmful. People need to think about sun protection every day – not just those days at the lake, beach, or pool. Sun exposure adds up. Simply staying in the shade is one of the best ways to limit the harmful effects of ultraviolet (UV) exposure. If you are going to be in the sun, remember Slip! Slop! Slap! and Wrap!

  • Slip-on a shirt.
  • Slop on sunscreen.
  • Slap on a hat.
  • Wrap on sunglasses.

If you think you have a suspicious mole, freckle or other skin concern, don’t wait for next year’s clinic. Make an appointment with your primary care provider or go to a walk-in clinic.

Article by Megan Upton.