Moose is Loose – and Healthy at Chippewa Park

The moose at Chippewa Park is healthy but officials will have a large animal vet check it out to be sure
The moose at Chippewa Park is dead

The moose is not loose. Social Media Postings on a "starving moose' appeared in Thunder Bay
The moose is not loose. Social Media Postings on a “starving moose’ appeared in Thunder Bay

Social Media Missed the Starving Moose 

THUNDER BAY – The power of social media is evident in Thunder Bay. A posting of a picture with the caption suggesting the moose at Chippewa Park is “starving” was posted online on Facebook. There were well over sixty comments, with many people appearing ready to head to the popular park and rescue the moose.

The only part missing in the story posted on Facebook were the facts.

The moose at Chippewa Park is healthy but officials will have a large animal vet check it out to be sure
The moose at Chippewa Park is healthy but officials will have a large animal vet check it out to be sure

Starving Moose Image Shared with City Councillors

The frustration caused people to contact City Councillors, and even to contact former city councillors to “do something”. Councillor Aldo Ruberto contacted NetNewsLedger to share that the moose at Chippewa Park was “Has been raised as a baby at the park. The angle of the shot makes it look pathetic. I am assure when it stands up and walks around it is like a Rhino. The person taking the shot had a bad angle that happens every-time a family member takes a picture of me”.

Several citizens even contacted former City Councillor Frank Pullia to get something done to save the starving moose.

The Chippewa Park Moose is Healthy

 The moose at Chippewa Park Wildlife Exhibit is fed a diet which includes five gallons of dairy rations per day, plus two gallons of moose maintenence – a blend of grains, apples and carrots – an ample supply of hay and is hand fed poplar leaves and branches (a moose favourite!). He has unlimited access to clean water as well. 

“He eats all his food every day and behaves like a healthy moose. To alley any concerns in the community, arrangements are being made to have a large animal vet come and cofirm that the moose is well”. Chippewa Park officials commented, “Our moose is now five-years-old and came to Chippewa as an orphaned newborn through the MNR. He was bottle-fed and has developed a strong bond with the animal feeder (above) at the Park over the years”. 

The issue of a potentially starving moose at the Chippewa Park Wildlife Exhibit generated a lot of interest. In the City of Thunder Bay’s latest report on Citizen Satisfaction, mention was made of the growing use of social media in our city. This is perhaps a good example of how social media in our city can generate action. However for many on social media, sometimes the speed of getting information out there is massive. Getting it right isn’t set as high sometimes on the priority scale.

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